Happy Shark Week! We’re celebrating it on Fathom too.

(Via marine-conservation: This is probably the closest you will ever get from a Great White shark bite without being injured or losing a limb.

In 2013, a team from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution took a specially equipped REMUS “SharkCam” underwater vehicle to Guadalupe Island in Mexico to film great white sharks in the wild. They captured more than they hoped for. This incredible footage is set to air on this year’s Shark Week. 

REMUS stands for Remote Environmental Monitoring Unit.The pre-programmed SharkCam is controlled by scientists, and features 6 GoPro video cameras, providing a spectacular 360 degrees view of the surroundings. These cameras were mounted on underwater probe REMUS-100. It can go as deep as 100 meters or 328 feet and can stay underwater for a maximum of eight hours.

REMUS doesn’t intrude with the routines or behavior of marine animals. However, it was getting noticed by a bunch of sharks, stalked, and sometimes bitten from underneath.  The SharkCam was fortunate enough to have survived the series of shark attacks and brought home recordings for scientific studies—along with the shark bite marks on it.)


The Carta marina (Latin “map of the sea” or “sea map”), drawn by Olaus Magnus in 1527-39, is the earliest map of the Nordic countries that gives details and place names.

The Carta marina (Latin “map of the sea” or “sea map”), drawn by Olaus Magnus in 1527-39, is the earliest map of the Nordic countries that gives details and place names.